Who Owns Haiti? Edited Volume Published

We are proud to announce that Who Owns Haiti? People, Power, and Sovereignty, edited by Robert Maguire and Scott Freeman, has been published by the University Press of Florida.

The edited volume builds off of the Focus On Haiti Initiative’s 2014 conference, Who ‘Owns’ Haiti? Sovereignty in a Fragile Stateincluding chapters by speakers at the event and from across disciplines.

The book is now for sale by the University Press of Florida. An excerpt and the table of contents are also available to view online.

 


 

WOHCover.pngWho Owns Haiti? explores the role of international actors in the country’s sovereign affairs while highlighting the ways in which Haitians continually enact their own independence on economic, political, and cultural levels. The contributing authors contemplate Haiti’s sovereign roots from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including political science, anthropology, history, economics, and development studies. They also consider the assertions of sovereignty from historically marginalized urban and rural populations. This volume addresses how Haitian institutions, grassroots organizations, and individuals respond to and resist external influence. Examining how foreign actors encroach on Haitian autonomy and shape–or fail to shape–Haiti’s fortunes, it argues that varying discussions of ownership are central to Haiti’s future as a sovereign state.

 

“A timely collection of articles by some of the leading and emerging scholars and specialists on Haiti, offering a wide range of critical perspectives on the question and meaning of sovereignty in Haiti.”–Alex Dupuy, coauthor of The Prophet and Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the International Community, and Haiti

 

“Directly asks the provocative question of ownership and Haitian sovereignty within the post-earthquake moment–an unstable period in which ideas on (re)development, humanitarianism, globalization, militarism, self-determination, and security converge.”–Millery Polyné, author of From Douglass to Duvalier: U.S. African Americans, Haiti, and Pan Americanism, 1870-1964

 

“Powerful essays by experts in their fields addressing what matters most to smaller nations–the meaning of sovereignty, and the horrid trajectory from colonialism, to neocolonialism into neoliberalism.”–Patrick Bellegarde-Smith, author of Haiti: The Breached Citadel

 

 

HRA Expo on GW’s Campus

2016HRAEXPOflyerThe Haiti Renewal Alliance, in partnership with the George Washington University Center for International Business Education Research (GWU-CIBER), hosted the 7th Annual HRA Business Investment Expo & Conference on GW’s campus June 14-15, 2016.

The Focus On Haiti Initiative previously partnered with the HRA in September of 2015, co-hosting the Haiti Presidential Townhall meeting, available online.

Continue reading

Liberated Haiti: Thirty Years After Duvalier

By Robert Maguire, originally posted by Latin America Goes Global.

February 7, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the ouster of Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier as President of Haiti, ending the 29 year Duvalier family dictatorship. When Baby Doc fled the country in 1986 for exile in France, massive street celebrations burst out, calling his departure Haiti’s second independence.   In the weeks that followed, it seemed as if almost everyone wore a tee shirt proclaiming “Haiti Libérée.” Optimism reigned that the misgoverned country would transition in relatively short order from dictatorship to democracy and that life would improve for all, particularly the more than 75 percent of the country’s population surviving on an average of $2.00 a day or less. Continue reading

Pepper Water and Protests in Haiti

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Pepper Water and Protests in Haiti

Scott Freeman

Tear gas is not uncommon in Port au Prince. Over the past decade, whether it has been protests over food shortages, controlling political demonstrations, or ‘peacekeeping’ actions by the infamous MINUSTAH UN forces, tear gas and other methods of crowd control have been a reality of the political and social landscape in downtown Port-au-Prince. A veteran reporter in Haiti told me that he had developed all sorts of strategies to deal with tear gas, ranging use of lime under his nose to more preventative measures like always having a paint masks handy. Continue reading

Martelly at Howard University: A Concerning View on Poverty and Education?

President Martelly Speaks at Howard University

President Martelly Speaks at Howard University

Martelly’s speech last Wednesday at Howard University drew attention to his administration’s focus on free and universal education.  But while promoting both his education agenda and a nascent collaboration with Howard University, the President of Haiti also portrayed a disturbing depiction of the Haitian people.

Both Martelly and the Howard University administration discussed planned educational exchanges, promising an educational partnership that draws on solidarity between the prominent historically black University and the first black Republic. “African Americans and Haitians are connected by history,” Martelly said. “But we can also be connected by choice — united in partnership.” Continue reading

Streaming video: (Un)Making a Dominican: The Context for Denationalization

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“The Price of Sugar” screening was well attended, and for those who weren’t able to come, the film sparked a rather intense discussion about Dominican citizenship, and the current judicial and executive decisions affecting the country.

As a follow up  to these discussions, we wanted to draw attention to an event occurring this evening (December 5th, 6pm) at the CUNY graduate center:

“Join us for a public event and conversation addressing the recent ruling of the Dominican Constitutional Court to strip Dominicans of Haitian descent of their citizenship. In solidarity with other organizations and worldwide actions, scholars, artists, students, and activists discuss the ruling and its effects. Film Screening of Birthrights Crisis will help illuminate the history of the issue, along with a musical performance by Kalunga Neg Mawon Haitian-Dominican Music band.”

“Conquering Cholera in Haiti and the Dominican Republic” – Panel Discussion

By Nic Johnson, Undergraduate Research Assistant

On October 24, 2013, Representative Barbara Lee (CA) and the Global Health Caucus hosted “Conquering Cholera in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: The Untold Story of Progress” at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C. The briefing featured representatives of public health organizations and advocacy groups to discuss new policy initiatives and partnerships for the elimination of cholera in Hispaniola.

Karen Goraleski, Executive Director of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, introduced the background of the event, a “call to action” in January 2012 that began a partnership between Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and a group of more than 20 international organizations to eliminate cholera on the island of Hispaniola by 2022. This international coalition led to the creation of the 2013 National Plan for the Elimination of Cholera in Haiti. Continue reading